Building Green2019-01-24T18:04:49+00:00

Building Green

What is a Green Home?

A green home is built or renovated using a holistic approach to design that reduces energy consumption, neutralizes the negative impact buildings have on the environment, and provides a healthier indoor atmosphere for your family. Looking at a green home side-by-side with a standard built home, you probably couldn’t tell which one was green because “green” is not a style, like “Contemporary” or “Craftsman.”

Use Less Energy, Pay Less For Utilities

Thoughtful green home innovations include environmentally-friendly insulations, an orientation towards light, emphasis on air circulation, and the use of energy efficient appliances and lighting. Green homeowners use less energy and pay less for utilities, enjoy a healthy indoor atmosphere and a satisfaction that comes from knowing they’re helping the environment.

Specific Strategies Typically Used in Green Homes

Thermally efficient roofs, walls, and windows that reduce heating loads and enhance thermal comfort.

Building shape and orientation, thermal mass, and daylighting strategies that reduce cooling loads.

Significantly smaller HVAC systems and efficient electrical lighting strategies that capitalize on daylighting.

Water efficient supply and waste fixtures.

Adaptable interior designs, providing visual access to the outdoors, and access to daylight.

Interior finishes and installation methods that have lower VOC emissions.

Landscaping strategies that require little or no irrigation, permit groundwater replenishment, and provide on-site stormwater management.

Siting to minimize stress on natural systems either by building on previously contaminated sites or avoiding ecologically sensitive areas.

Did You Know?

  • The average heating and air ductwork has a 30% loss of rated air flow (research by TX/OK utilities, cities and universities).
  • Random air leakage can cause up to 40% of a homes energy loss.
  • Windows can be as much as 46% of a homes energy loss.
  • According to U.S Department of Energy installing Low E windows instead of double pane clear can reduce a 5 ton cooling load to 3.5 tons.
  • Most windows are not installed properly.